Help
lexigame.com the home of unique word games

Lexigame Community
October 23, 2017, 08:41:28 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with email, password and session length
News:
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar Login Register  
Pages: 1 [2] 3
  Print  
Author Topic: Common animals - 4 April 17 standard  (Read 1387 times)
Les303
Cryptoverbalist
*
Posts: 705



View Profile
« Reply #15 on: August 12, 2017, 10:32:09 AM »

And as for “reascend”!!!  Well I ask you!  How on earth did this become “common”?

Definitely agree with oldpaul on this one as it cost me a rosette in that game.



* 453783889.jpg (4.79 KB, 170x113 - viewed 121 times.)
Logged

Les from Brisbane ; Australia
oldpaul
Neophyte
*
Posts: 8


View Profile
« Reply #16 on: August 12, 2017, 05:34:15 PM »

Touche mkenuk about manuel and the moose head!

Pat, I did try to persuade two of my friends to play online here and both thought the list of common words was too rudimentary for their liking.  On the other hand, I did buy one of them two of Alan’s Chihuahua puzzle books and she told me the other day that she had nearly done all the puzzles and was thinking of buying a couple more of the books!
Logged
Alan W
Administrator
Eulexic
*****
Posts: 3300


Melbourne, Australia


View Profile Email
« Reply #17 on: August 12, 2017, 05:57:45 PM »

Oldpaul, eland won't be disappearing from the puzzle, it just won't be treated as common. I'm guessing that some Scrabble enthusiasts wouldn't be particularly bothered about whether a word is classed as common or rare since they will be aiming for higher targets than getting all the common words: the Maven and Cham levels and, at the lofty pinnacle of Chi success, the glittering golden trophy! Maybe your friends who weren't impressed with the common word list need some intermediate category - the medium rare list perhaps.

The test for a common word is meant to be whether the great majority of players will know the word. It doesn't necessarily matter if it's a word one never uses. I doubt if there's a single Chi player who doesn't know the words bison and moose. In trying to find evidence to inform my assessments I often look at sources of usage statistics, but that sort of evidence isn't always conclusive, especially in relation to comparative and superlative words. Someone might never have heard or seen ashiest, but they could still think of it as a valid word. (Ashiest is another word on the outstanding list of queries, mainly because of the current inconsistency in the treatment of ashier and ashiest.)

Here's an extract from the transcript of a 2010 radio program on the US NPR network, featuring host Liane Hansen, crossword expert Will Shortz and a contestant.

Quote
HANSEN: ...All right. Well, you gave us a challenge last week and it was hard. I mean, stymied me. So, let's repeat the challenge.

SHORTZ: Yes. I said take the plural name of an animal, take the singular name of another animal, say the two words out loud one after the other and you'll name a country. What are the animals and what is the country?

HANSEN: And your answer?

SHORTZ: Well, the animals are gnus G-N-U-S and an eland E-L-A-N-D - both animals from Africa - say them together you say gnus-eland or New Zealand.

HANSEN: Wow. I never would've gotten eland. It's the first time I've ever seen that word. But apparently enough people were stymied because we did have over 1,100 entries but sometimes we get a lot more than that. But out of those we have a winner: Jay Livingston from New York City. Hi, Jay.

Mr. JAY LIVINGSTON: Hello.

HANSEN: So, how long did it take you to solve this puzzle?

Mr. LIVINGSTON: Gee, I don't remember. I remember my first guess was Spain but I knew that couldn't be right. So...

HANSEN: But you knew what an eland was.

Mr. LIVINGSTON: Well, it's because I do crosswords and that's where you find elands...
Logged

Alan Walker
Creator of Lexigame websites
2dognight
Neophyte
*
Posts: 47


View Profile Email
« Reply #18 on: August 12, 2017, 06:20:21 PM »

For Pat
I do hope you will see an  Echidna while you are in Australia

They are my favourite Australian animal and I see them quite regularly

Have been known to stop the car and remove them from the road to the bush

I always have gloves in the car!!

The babies are called puggles

Have a great time in Australia you might be lucky and see an Antichinus

Carol
Logged
yelnats
Linguissimo
*****
Posts: 279



View Profile WWW
« Reply #19 on: August 12, 2017, 06:28:58 PM »

You may see both male and female antechinus at this time of year. In May, there are only females...

Strange little animals.
Logged
pat
Eulexic
***
Posts: 2485


Rugby, England.


View Profile
« Reply #20 on: August 12, 2017, 07:40:39 PM »

I think there's a chance of seeing an echidna, Carol, and possibly a duck-billed platypus, (both of which have been spotted on previous birding tours to OZ), even though our attention will mostly be focused upwards. The closest we have here (in appearance of course; your part of the world has a monopoly on monotremes!) is, as you probably know, the hedgehog. Apparently there used to be 30 million in the UK; now there are around 1 million. Like you with your echidnas, if I see one crossing the road I pick them up and put them out of harm's way. I'm fortunate enough to have at least one, often two and sometimes three, visit my garden every night for the food I put out for them.  Their young are generally known as hoglets; I didn't know that an echidna's young were called puggles - a word to look out for in Chi!

And I've never heard of the antechinus. What a cute little critter it is. I guess that's a word that will never appear in Chi!
Logged
Maudland
Logologist
**
Posts: 97


London, UK


View Profile
« Reply #21 on: August 13, 2017, 12:54:09 AM »

What a job Alan has, striking a balance between accessible and challenging! A patient marvel. I tend not to worry so much about the common/rare classifications (although a rosette and better than 'best' score is my aim). When I don't get a common word it'll either be a 'doh!' moment, or if it's an unknown word, I'll see it as my ignorance rather than faulty classification. And when a word I see as common is designated rare, I reckon there will be good reasons for it (even though it sometimes dismays me). When I started playing, I was more often surprised by how differently the various parts of the English-speaking world use words, and I find this eye-opening and fascinating.

I have significant gaps in my knowledge especially around scientific, technical, medical, legal and musical terms (blimey, that's nearly everything?!) so I love finding new words and their meanings.

So I'm very grateful for this thread (as well as Chi, generally!). I had never heard of an echidna before! What an amazing little animal. ❤️

Have an awesome time in Oz, Pat - looking forward to seeing some of your fabulous pictures.
Maud

« Last Edit: August 13, 2017, 01:52:07 AM by Maudland » Logged
TRex
Glossologian
**
Posts: 1263


~50 miles from Chicago, in the Corn (maize) Belt


View Profile
« Reply #22 on: August 13, 2017, 01:30:12 AM »

Maybe your friends who weren't impressed with the common word list need some intermediate category - the medium rare list perhaps.

Just what you need, Alan: another category to multiply the headache of classifying & reclassifying words!
Logged
Les303
Cryptoverbalist
*
Posts: 705



View Profile
« Reply #23 on: August 13, 2017, 03:04:55 AM »

Maudland ,

When I first started playing chi , I was absolutely confused by the way in which some words were classified.
So I queried a few (usually only when the word in question had cost me a rosette ) but invariably Alan would provide a very definitive argument & reject my suggestion.

I think that your post was just brilliant as you were able to clearly explain your attitude to the game which is very simple & straightforward & in my opinion should be adopted by all players.

That is not to say that I or any other player should not challenge words that we feel are classified incorrectly.

P.S.... my list of "gaps in knowledge " is about 10 times longer than yours.

oldpaul , as a new player , I hope you find this post to be helpful.





Logged

Les from Brisbane ; Australia
Maudland
Logologist
**
Posts: 97


London, UK


View Profile
« Reply #24 on: August 13, 2017, 06:26:41 AM »

Les, I know exactly what you mean about the confusion - that was also when I realised the differences between versions of English were so much wider and more varied than I thought. It's also why I love reading the forum, as well as the interesting / funny things people have to say. There's a whole world out there!

Challenging words is, of course, fine, I agree - things change. Plus I love reading Alan's research and his witty comments.

And the gaps I listed were only the most significant ones ("I know nothing" as Manuel would say). If I started writing all of them, I'd still be at it tomorrow morning...  Sleepy
Logged
Alan W
Administrator
Eulexic
*****
Posts: 3300


Melbourne, Australia


View Profile Email
« Reply #25 on: August 13, 2017, 11:27:13 AM »

...but invariably Alan would provide a very definitive argument & reject my suggestion.

Not literally, since I accepted your suggestions in regard to limn, fain, loosing, amyl, oedipal, tibial and epilog.
Logged

Alan Walker
Creator of Lexigame websites
Greynomad
Neophyte
*
Posts: 14


View Profile
« Reply #26 on: August 13, 2017, 12:24:19 PM »

Well personally Alan, I think you do a great job, the game remains challenging, and I am more than happy to accept your decision regarding words.

Keep up the good work.

PS I like the Eland, and there are a great deal more obscure words that I find classified as common than that one. But that is the charm and frustration of the game.
Logged
Les303
Cryptoverbalist
*
Posts: 705



View Profile
« Reply #27 on: August 13, 2017, 12:46:14 PM »

Alan ,

I do apologise if my post gave the impression that your response to word challenges was always negative.
I just did not want to appear to be boastful by highlighting those suggestions of mine to which you did agree & elected to change.

Thanks Les

Logged

Les from Brisbane ; Australia
Calilasseia
Lexicomane
***
Posts: 132


Pass the dissection kit ...


View Profile
« Reply #28 on: September 06, 2017, 05:02:54 PM »

I think there's a chance of seeing an echidna, Carol, and possibly a duck-billed platypus, (both of which have been spotted on previous birding tours to OZ), even though our attention will mostly be focused upwards. The closest we have here (in appearance of course; your part of the world has a monopoly on monotremes!) is, as you probably know, the hedgehog. Apparently there used to be 30 million in the UK; now there are around 1 million. Like you with your echidnas, if I see one crossing the road I pick them up and put them out of harm's way. I'm fortunate enough to have at least one, often two and sometimes three, visit my garden every night for the food I put out for them.  Their young are generally known as hoglets; I didn't know that an echidna's young were called puggles - a word to look out for in Chi!

And I've never heard of the antechinus. What a cute little critter it is. I guess that's a word that will never appear in Chi!

Oh, I've heard of Antechinus, or to be correct, Antechinus (the italic form denoting a taxonomic Genus). There are actually several species of Antechinus, otherwise known as marsupial mice. Which have a hilarious claim to fame.

Basically, the moment the mating season arrives, male individuals quite literally stop thinking about anything but sex. They don't even bother eating or drinking once the hormones kick in. They simply devote themselves to non stop horizontal jogging, so to speak.

Of course, this singular devotion to mating comes at a price. The males pretty soon end up looking as if they've been put through a shredder, and give the impression that bits will fall off them at any moment, once the wear and tear becomes floridly manifest. Enjoy the hilarity as depicted in this YouTube video clip. Cheesy
Logged

Remember: if the world's bees disappear, we become extinct with them ...
anonsi
Glossologian
**
Posts: 1910


Iowa, US


View Profile
« Reply #29 on: September 07, 2017, 05:26:14 AM »

I've never managed to find the word eland when it's playable in a Chi puzzle. It's not a word that I knew outside of Chi. I went to the zoo with my young daughter recently...Wouldn't you know it, there're some on display there!

The word echidna is familiar to me. That being said, I likely wouldn't find it in a Chi puzzle since its letters are not in a common pattern that my brain tends to look for when playing Chi.  laugh
Logged
Pages: 1 [2] 3
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2006, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.065 seconds with 21 queries.