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Author Topic: Radix  (Read 734 times)
pat
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« on: June 01, 2017, 02:19:12 AM »

I was one short of a rosette in the 'taxidermy' puzzle, the missing word being 'radix', a word I'm not familiar with. It may just be my ignorance but I suspect that as only 26 out of 375 people played it, it may not be a common word at all.
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TRex
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« Reply #1 on: June 01, 2017, 10:59:26 AM »

I agree. (I stumbled into it, but it didn't mean what I thought it did.)
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mkenuk
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« Reply #2 on: June 01, 2017, 12:09:17 PM »


I was  one of the 26 who played it.

I think it should probably be rare.

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Les303
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« Reply #3 on: June 01, 2017, 03:48:49 PM »

I agree. (I stumbled into it, but it didn't mean what I thought it did.)

Radix is not familiar or common to me , so just curious TRex , what did you think it was?

I played " titman " in Tuesday's 10 letter game & was surprised & just a little amused when it was accepted as a rare word.
I was even more surprised when I viewed the definition as it was far removed from what I had envisaged.
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Les from Brisbane ; Australia
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« Reply #4 on: June 01, 2017, 06:38:19 PM »

Radox is more common in our house. Reminded me of an old one from my choral society days, used of any baton wielder who had fallen out of favour with the singers:

What's the difference between [name your conductor] and a Radox foot bath? A Radox foot bath bucks up the feet.
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TRex
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« Reply #5 on: June 02, 2017, 12:06:48 PM »

Radix is not familiar or common to me , so just curious TRex , what did you think it was?

I thought it was something like a rootlet.
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a non-amos
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« Reply #6 on: June 02, 2017, 01:13:02 PM »

TR, you are not far off but this is arithmetic.  It is a root . . .

This is the "base" in "base 10" numbers (i.e. the radix is 10).  Many digital systems operate in "base 2" (binary, the radix is 2).  Other systems are hexidecimal (radix = 16) or octal (radix = Cool.

Other systems are different.  In Mayan numbers the radix is 60.  Go figure.
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a non-amos
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« Reply #7 on: June 02, 2017, 01:31:59 PM »

Why on earth did this thing substitute a  Cool for the number 8?  No clues here.
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Carpe digitus.
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Les303
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« Reply #8 on: June 02, 2017, 02:14:11 PM »

I agree. (I stumbled into it, but it didn't mean what I thought it did.)

Radix is not familiar or common to me , so just curious TRex , what did you think it was?

I played " titman " in Tuesday's 10 letter game & was surprised & just a little amused when it was accepted as a rare word.
I was even more surprised when I viewed the definition as it was far removed from what I had envisaged.


Since nobody took the bait to ask me what I thought might have been the definition for titman ... I'll tell you anyway.
Chi's definition was " the runt of a litter or a short person.'
Obviously I thought it would be a man who had a liking for tits & of course i'm talking about small birds.
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Les from Brisbane ; Australia
Alan W
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« Reply #9 on: June 02, 2017, 03:30:44 PM »

Why on earth did this thing substitute a  Cool for the number 8?  No clues here.

It's actually the 8 followed immediately by a right parenthesis which is the text version of that smiley.
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Alan Walker
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mkenuk
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« Reply #10 on: June 02, 2017, 03:43:08 PM »

An apocryphal story I heard many years ago told of a country parson who, in the early days of broadcasting, was given a radio, or - as we used to call them in UK - a wireless.
A parishioner came round to install it for the vicar and to show him how to operate it.

However, after turning the set on, the first words to come out of the speakers were ' ...tits like coconuts.'

Horrified, the set was immediately disconnected and the priest sat down to write an angry letter to the BBC.

He received a reply a few days later, apologizing for any offense but pointing out that, had he stayed tuned, he would have heard the ornithologist go on to inform his listeners that other birds such as robins were partial to a little bacon rind on the bird table in winter.

MK
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Calilasseia
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« Reply #11 on: June 12, 2017, 01:40:27 PM »

TR, you are not far off but this is arithmetic.  It is a root . . .

This is the "base" in "base 10" numbers (i.e. the radix is 10).  Many digital systems operate in "base 2" (binary, the radix is 2).  Other systems are hexidecimal (radix = 16) or octal (radix = Cool.

Other systems are different.  In Mayan numbers the radix is 60.  Go figure.

Actually, Mayan numerals are radix-20. See here for more details. You're thinking of the Babylonian number system, as covered here.

There's also a radix 64 encoding system for Web content. Used to be used before the days of UTF-8 and UniCode. More on this here.
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Alan W
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« Reply #12 on: August 22, 2017, 02:47:21 PM »


I was  one of the 26 who played it.

I think it should probably be rare.



I'm not surprised MK was one of the few who thought of this word, since he had mentioned it only a few weeks before, in a topic about Latin plurals, wondering whether radix and its plural radices were treated as common. Both the Latin plural radices and the English-style plural radixes are classed as rare. I have no hesitation in saying the singular should be rare too.

In the Corpus of Contemporary American English there are 15 occurrences of radix, 12 of them in academic publications. Of the other three, two seem to be using it as a Latin word (e.g. "In this sense it is radical -- a recovery of roots (radix) long hidden by the barnacled accumulations of custom, habit and cultural overlay.") The other example is a mis-transcription of a broadcast: "Radix (ph.) regime" for "Radek's regime", from the film Air Force One. The word is definitely rare.
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Alan Walker
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